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July 08, 2014

Comments

Eliza

One time I told my brother to read a story of mine "until you get bored". Forty nine pages in, he handed it back. "I'm bored now." I read over that page and realized he'd stopped at the first death scene. Gasp! What was I thinking, letting my sweet eleven year old brother read a book with a gory decapitation scene? When I asked him why he stopped, he told me, "Only one person dies in the first fifty pages. Usually someone dies in the prologue."

Carlie

I gave birth to my first baby six months ago, and I can't now read certain things without becoming emotionally invested (and often crying). My husband has suggested I stop reading the news. (And why did I think it was a good idea to reread "Walk Two Moons"?)

Audrey

The lead up to the Forest Bands joining in the fight is filled with tension - moreso when 'normal' things, like boys playing at sword practice and laughing, are contrasted with actually being in battle. As a reader I feel compelled to take them all away from it. To say "turn back, stay safe" and yet I am trapped. Helpless. And when they wind up in the battle it is something my inner eye can't turn away from.

Finn. Finn is a wonderful character and I love how he's one of the Forest Born shown to understand what a battle means. The contrast between him and the younger boys playing at swords is stark; I can only imagine what sort of things were going through his mind during this chapter. I imagine that he, like Conrad, is happy with just being a supporting character in someone else's story, though that might be because he HAS been such a big supporting character for these first two books.

Anna

I think Conrad was brought in at very appropriate times. I felt I had enough of Conrad's story for me to like him.

What was your favorite part about writing Enna Burning?

Esa

In that earlier draft, was Enna's husband Finn, or someone else?

Heather

I really hate that people have to die in wars. It's so stupid. You wrote it well.

I convinced a homeschooling group across the country (I'm in TX, they're in MA) to read Goose Girl in their book club one month this coming school year. :)

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